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Thursday, May 14, 2015

Oatmeal Patties

As an Adventist I grew up in a vegetarian community; an SDA ghetto if you will in Keene, Texas. For a long time you couldn't buy meat hardly anywhere in the city. You had to drive five miles to Cleburne five miles away to get a hamburger.

My grandmother who was a cook at Southwestern Adventist college where she worked magic with vegetarian substitutes, some commercial and some the ladies just made up.  Any vegetable protein you could think of seemed to form the basis for local vegetarian cuisine. One ingredient in particular found it's way into everything from bread to "patties".  Oatmeal.

Oatmeal is an Adventist staple. Oatmeal forms the basis of many Adventist vegetarian main dishes. When I say oatmeal is versatile, I mean you can throw all sorts of stuff into a mixing bowl with oatmeal and fry it up. This version is a kind of clean out the leftovers version. If I'm out of vege-meat, these oatmeal patties are my fall-back. Here's how you make them:

Patty Ingredients:

  • 3 cups rolled oats, instant or regular oatmeal (it all works)
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/4 large onion chopped
  • 1/2 cup pecan meal or slivered almonds (optional)
  • 1 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 package Lipton Onion Soup mix
  • 2 eggs
Gravy Ingredients:
  • Handful sliced mushrooms
  • 1/4 chopped onion
  • 1/2 package of Lipton Onion Soup
  • Leftover oil from frying patties
  • 4 tbsp. flour, (for the gravy)
  • 1 cup Water
 Directions:
  1. Pour the oil in a skillet and preheat it while you make up the patty mix.
  2. Mix together all the patty ingredients in a mixing bowl. Note: you don't have to have pecan meal. If you have pecans or walnuts, just whiz them up in the blender till they are the consistency of meal. The pecan meal really kicks up the protein levels in the dish. You can add soy sauce or leave it out and just go with the pecan meal for flavor. I recently tried slivered almonds when I didn't have pecan meal and it's amazing. Really great flavor.  I've even added leftover cottage cheese and sour cream (or onion dip) and given them a little pizzazz. Some crushed Special K Cereal is nice too if you like. The recipe is very flexible. The trick is to get the consistency of the mixture right so that the patties don't fall apart. If you add too much extra stuff you should add an extra egg or some of that new Vegan egg replacement that just came out.
  3. Once you've got the patty mix prepared, form the mixture into balls and place the balls in the skillet and flatten them with a spatula. Allow them to cook until brown and flip them over to brown on the other side. 
  4. Set the patties aside. They make pretty good vegeburgers as this stage. To complete this as a main dish, you need to make the gravy now.
  5. Turn down the heat a bit under the oil. Toss in the chopped onions and carmelize them by cooking them slowly on low heat. Takes about 15 minutes or so, but well worth the time. After the onions are about halfway done, add the mushrooms.
  6. Next, sprinkle a handful of flour into the skillet with the oil, mushrooms and onions. 
  7. Turn up the heat a little and lightly blend the flour into the oil until it starts to brown. Add Lipton Onion Soup and water, stirring constantly till the gravy forms. Stir until all the lumps of flour are absorbed.
  8. In a Pyrex casserole dish, spread out the cooked patties and pour the gravy over the patties.
  9. Place the dish in the oven at 350 degrees and bake until the gravy bubbles. 
  10. Now you can work on the rest of the stuff to go with it while the oatmeal patties bake. 
Conclusion:


These go well with anything that would go with vege-burger, hamburger or most any vegetarian meat substitute. The wife usually makes mashed potatoes and corn. Baked potatoes, broccoli and a salad are also nice. Throw in some homemade bread or wheat rolls and you've got a lovely meal.

Leftover oatmeal patties make nice sandwiches or vegeburgers too. I love leftover oatmeal patty burgers.

Enjoy.

(c) 2015 by Tom king

95 comments:

  1. This was obviously before the days when canola oil was discovered to be a GMO product.

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    1. Maybe they've changed it but when I read the recipe it just said vegetable oil - non specific. So you can use extra-extra virgin cold-pressed olive oil if you wanted - or organic non gmo coconut oil

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    2. You are correct. The recipe calls for vegetable oil. I like canola because it's a mono-unsaturated oil, but I also love olive oil in this recipe to. Gives it a nice flavor. I use olive oil whenever I have it. Technically olive oil, being plant based is a "vegetable" oil.

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    3. Oh, good grief, can't people use some common sense and just say thank you to you for giving us this nice recipe and make changes as necessary for themselves when they prepare it? Thanks for all you do! Jill

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    4. LOL Exactly Jill (Anonymous)!! People stress out over the most ridiculous crap! Thanks for the recipe reminder Potluck Vegetarian!! :D ..... See Juliana? How hard is that?! SMH

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  2. I usually don't post comments of this sort because I want this to be a cheerful and happy website. That said, I went ahead and published the comment, which was meant in the best of spirits I am certain. I want to take this opportunity to, one last time clarify the mission of this website. This is not a militant vegan website. This is not a place to air evil conspiracy theories about food. I don't freak out over the GMO issue. I embrace lacto-ovo vegetarianism. I don't have a problem with people who are only partial vegetarians or those who eat fish. Jesus ate fish. Anyone who says different is in denial.

    As to the GMO issue, any hybrid or selectively bread animal or plant is technically modified genetically. It is an ancient practice. Jacob (the patriarch) did it with sheep and made himself wealthy when Cousin Laban tried to cheat him. The data isn't consistent in showing that GMOs have negative health effects. If that changes I will likely alter some recipes, but until then, I'm not going to get into a rancorous debate with the "vegetarians-waiting-for-the-coming-of-the-Lord" crowd. I kid you not, I knew someone who described herself in just those words. We do not get to heaven by being vegan, although we may be vegan because we happen to be going to heaven. Strict veganism does not make one holy. Too often it does the opposite. If one uses ones veganism to excuse harsh, judgmental and arrogant behavior, it can produce in a person traits that were not found in Christ.

    In the meantime, I shall continue to celebrate potluck food in its many lovely presentations. Potluck food may not always be the healthiest versions of various vegetarian dishes, but remember it's supposed to be feast food; celebration cuisine. Potluck food makes grouchy people happy (if only for a short while). It makes hungry people not hungry. It gives young people the energy to do what young people got to do. It makes old Adventists like me smile and with my old knees, long ago damaged in the service of my Lord, anything that makes me smile these days is something wonderful.

    And not all Canola oil is made from GMOs, so don't freak out. I have, however, in deference to some of my brethrens' tender sensibilities, changed Canola oil to "vegetable" oil in the recipe above.

    And, as Forrest Gump would say, "That's all I've got to say about that."

    Tom

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    1. Good answer. I don't get all the hype over GMOs.

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    3. Few people, including yourself, know much about GMB or hybridization, and much misinformation is being distributed wantonly. The hype about GMO has not been very accurate, and been self serving for both pro and anti sides.
      All plants self-hybridize to some extent, as all plants within a species can and often to, cross pollinate. Human hybridization is simply controlling what plant variety (within a species) shall be the female and which the male, rather than random. Humans make the choices for their own perceived benefit. The same is done with, say, dogs. That does not make them BMO dogs!! So, this is a process of nature, merely selective breeding.
      GMO, on the other hand, is INSERTING a gene that is not natural to the species, and can be either plant or animal. This does NOT occur in nature. It is also NOT a mutation. GMOs are NOT natural. The insertion of such a gene is done for human benefit, only. Such as resistance to a herbicide a company is selling to kill weeds. The AGMO gene confers resistance to that herbicide, with obvious benefits to that company. Problem is there are consequences. For one, each gene has more than a single "expression", so other effects may not be known. Which is bad. Another is possible allergic reactions and other reactions. Another is contamination of non-GMO plants. GMO manufacturers have had the nerve to sue farmers whose plants were "raped" by the GMO pollen. Such is their power, though filthy lucre. Another is that pesky Mother Nature, which, through natural selection, selects weeds that survived the herbicide. Soon, there are "super weeds" that are immune to the herbicide. That has happened, so what did the herbicide company, since the millions developing the GMO plant proved transitory? Well, they bribed the US congress, first to make them immune from US courts. That nearly passed, but they got caught. So, they bribed the US congress to allow the corporation to add the major herbicide in Agent Orange to their herbicide, but used the chemical name. Many in congress and nearly all the public do not know the chemical name. Success! So, now the public faces dangers from Agent Orange's main ingredient.

      I don't know the solution to the mass ignorance of genetics, period, and surely the lack of knowledge to make intelligent decisions and valid opinions on this matter. Especially when getting aboard the GMO manufacturer's propaganda that DMOs have any equivalent or even similarity to natural processes. Confer with a true geneticist or prepare for some heavy reading. Dave Ladely; email: DaveLadely@aol.com

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    4. Proud of you Tom for saying it like it is!!! Hold tight my brother and bring on those good old recipes......I love them.

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    5. Thank you Tom. I go to the Winterset, Iowa church when I can. I am a truck driver, and don't get home much, and we have fellowship dinner every SABBATH . These patties are made by a lady there, and it is my absolute favorite.

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    6. Thank you Tom. I go to the Winterset, Iowa church when I can. I am a truck driver, and don't get home much, and we have fellowship dinner every SABBATH . These patties are made by a lady there, and it is my absolute favorite.

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    7. This recipe is a mainstay around my house. It can be modified many ways, adding or taking out anything that suits or doesn't suit you. As for any health issues, ask God's blessing upon what you eat, and enjoy. Many people have no food, and they certainly wouldn't care about some of the issues that are posted.

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    8. My husband grew up in Keene. His father was a Bible Pastor there....Elder Lewis. My husband's name is Spike Lewis...I wonder if you guys knew each other...

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    9. I didn't know Spike, but I knew M.D. Lewis' daughter Adenah.

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  3. I've just seen your blog for the first time and LOVE it! Sheila, your oatmeal patties look absolutely scrumptious, and I've clearly come home from the names of recipes I'm seeing. Good old SDA comfort food. :D

    Tom, I appreciate the interesting comment on GMOs, although I am one of those who leans towards the "label so we have a choice" side of the fence. I've seen a few of the loudest naysayers be first in line and pile their plates the highest with potluck foods without discrimination.

    A hearty amen to your description of what potluck food does for people!

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  4. This is fun! I've been looking for an Adventist cooking blog!

    Do you have a Facebook prescence one can "like" to get new postings when available? Thanks!

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  5. Glad to have you. I have a Facebook Author's page you can follow for updates at:

    https://www.facebook.com/ghostwritersinthesky?ref=hl

    You can also subscribe directly to this blog and get email updates whenever something new is published.

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  7. Mushroom or cream of mushroom soup?

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  8. Thanks for spotting that. Cream of Mushroom, of course. It's THE SDA casserole mainstay.

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    1. Except for those who cannot eat mushrooms (allergic). Seems like every dish at potluck has mushrooms. What could be substituted for mushrooms?

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    2. You can substitute cream of chicken, but then it wouldn't be vegetarian. I suppose you could substitute cream of potato soup in a pinch, or make up your own gravyish sort of substitute. The beauty of cooking is that there is so much room to be creative - a little olive oil, water and flour seasoned with McKay's chicken or beef seasoning could step in nicely for the mushroom soup.

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    3. We use Cream of Celery soup instead of Cream of Mushroom mostly because my husband doesn't like mushrooms.

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    4. Cream of Celery, or Cream of Onion soup works very well in this recipe. You can also make your own version of cream soup. There are many recipes out there for condensed cream of ... soups.
      Personally, I am not a fan of mushrooms, and use the onion or homemade soup subs. They work very well.

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    5. Loved all the casseroles growing up, but all that cream of whatever contains an ingredient called MSG. Some folks tolerate it just fine, while others, like myself, suffer horrific migraines from ingesting it. We didn't realize that it contained msg or that it could trigger migraines when I was a kid. There was no medicine for pain relief back then either so one just suffered through it the best they could. I had LOTS of them. Once I learned about various triggers though, I am mostly migraine free these days. If one has time, it's fairly easy to produce homemade condensed soups, thank goodness.

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    6. I can't use cream of anything soup because of the milk...I'm lactose intolerant. I make my own cream of WHATEVER soup with unsweetened soy or almond milk (plain, not vanilla), arrow root powder (it dissolves better and quicker without lumps), and whatever vegetarian or vegan flavoring I can find. I made a white gravy with this "Bakon" powder and Stripples for biscuits that turned out wonderful!!!

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  9. I forgot about Cream of Celery. That would work.

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    1. Hi Tom, they also have a cream of poblano which gives it a different twist. Love your posts and recipes.

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    2. Hi Tom, they also have a cream of poblano which gives it a different twist. Love your posts and recipes.

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  10. As much as I love healthy vegetarian cooking, have you thought about the contents of the canned mushroom soup or the packaged Lipton soup? The sodium or the other additives? Read the labels; surely we can find some better options.

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    1. I made this recipe WITHOUT the soy sauce and used 1/4 cup dried onion flakes, 1/4 tsp each onion powder and parsley flakes, 1/8 tsp each celery seed and paprika for the onion soup mix. Came out very well. Brought it to potluck and left with an empty dish. There are many ways to adjust this recipe to your own liking. Be creative!!

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  11. Sodium is salt. Scripture says salt is good. Salt is not what causes high blood pressure. Salt aggravates high blood pressure if you already have high blood pressure. It's not a causative factor. Overweight and lack of exercise are more to blame than anything. Reducing your consumption of high fat, high cholesterol meat products will do you far more good than worrying over a little soup in your casserole.

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  12. Thank you for sharing this recipe. I haven't had these in quite awhile. As a former Keenite, we occasionally ate Sabbath Dinner at the College cafe so I may have tasted some of your Grandmother's oatmeal patties before. :-)

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  13. Tom, thanks for this site!! It has some recipes that Mom used and I can't read the recipe anymore it is so old and stained.
    Katie Ann Towerton Lamb

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  14. Nice to read a recipe site written by a middle-of-the-road food person instead of a rabid vegan. I'm quite capable of substituting a can of vegeburger in place of a pound of hamburger in the meat recipes; I am equally capable of substituting cashew milk gravy in place of Campbell's if I have guests coming who are rabid vegans. Duh.

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    1. Not all vegans are rabid. Only those who have been bit by a mad dog or rabid wild animal. ;)

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  15. Thank you Judy. One of the things I like about the Adventist version of vegetarianism is that its practical and celebratory. I think half of the reason SDAs live longer on average is that we're happy about the way we eat and don't all feel like we need to belittle others or force people to be militant vegans. Vegetarian food is, for us, a celebration. A lot of the meat substitutes we use were developed by a returned missionary, Dr. Harry Miller who borrowed from Chinese cuisine which used soy, gluten and tofu-based products with lots of veggies. The companies he founded produce frozen, dried and canned products which are easy to use and which supply plant protein aplenty. And, as we point out in so many of our recipes, if you have the basic structure of the dish, a little experience will help you modify the dish to suit the proclivities of some of our more delicate vegetarian sensibilities. I personally prefer vegetarian food, especially the kind the little old ladies shove into tupperware containers or casserole dishes and bring to potluck. In college, my best friend and I used to ride around on his Harley every weekend to whatever church had a potluck going that week. These wonderful ladies actually would get offended if we only at one helping. We ate like a pair of anacondas and then we didn't need any food until next weekend. We had to take a nap, of course, before we road back to keep it between the ditches. Ah, potlucks. Without them we'd have starved while we were in college.

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  16. Tom, just found this site because an SDA friend posted the recipe for oatmeal patties. She and I went to Keene and reconnected at Homecoming this year. \My grandmother raised me and I lived in Keene all my school years and she made lots of casseroles and veggie burgers (which I love) but I don't have the recipes so I'll be joining this blog. I also worked at the school cafeteria (even though I was a "village kid") during Mrs. Cromwell's time there. Would you mind sharing your grandmother's name as I thought I might know her. Thanks, Beth Findley Fischer

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    1. My Grandmother was Mabel King. She worked there in the 50s and maybe the late 40s.

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  17. Tom, I just saw your grandmother on your home page (I think). I knew her well. She and my grandmother were good friends and they claimed to be relatives somewhere down the line. Barbara and I went to school together. I used to go see her and Adolph when I went down to see my grandparents. It is indeed a small world because of the internet. Beth

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    1. If you're related to my grandmother, then you're related to me Beth. Good to hear from you.

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  18. Thank you, I enjoy.

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  19. Love this and my oat meal patties are legendary!!! LOL...for those worried about everything...oat meal is so versatile it will respond well to anything and still be good. I stopped using egg, cheese and soups...bind with water just amped the garlic powder and onion powder, threw in some green pepper, sometimes a dash of Braggs and sometimes nutritional yeast, add parsley...yadda, yadda, yadda...do what works for you...the recipe as posted is delicious...adapt, modify, move on...

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    1. Which is the point of the style we use here. Fanatical vegans are as guilty of serving their bellies as a standard plan glutton. CS Lewis wrote about an old woman who was so picky hostesses dreaded to see her come. She never wanted to eat what was placed before her, but demanded just the smallest piece of plain toast. She firmly believed that because the demand was for something simple and inexpensive that she was somehow demonstrating her simplicity and goodness - no matter what extra work the hostess was put to. We, as cooks, hosts and hostesses and guests, should serve our fellows rather than our prejudices and desire to show off our piety.

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  20. A small point -- you mention the option of using EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) if one wishes. Of course it will work just fine, but most experienced cooks or kitchen managers would find the added expense of EVOO unnecessary as compared with ordinary grade olive oil. Many people do not understand that EVOO is the equivalent of better Belgian chocolates, or more expensive wine, or any other foodstuff where there is a premium grade made especially for direct consumption. When olive oil is being used in bulk in a recipe, and is not being used in way that you'll directly taste the raw oil, ordinary olive oil (much less expensive) would usually be fine. Your recommendation of coconut oil is excellent also -- a particularly healthy oil that has become much more common since Costco started selling it as a Kirkland product (*smile*).

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    1. I was being a bit sarcastic when I mentioned EVOO. I meant you can use whatever you think best. No need to get huffy about what kind of oil. I'm with you, Randy. Not that big a deal. The perfect oil going down the gullet of a sour human being doesn't do him much as much good as vegetable oil going down the digestive system of a happy person.

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  21. I started adding Peanut Butter in my oatmeal patties after reading abt someone else doing it and so I tried it and wow it's good.

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    1. That sounds tasty. My grandmother used to make a delicious peanut butter loaf.

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    2. Hi Tom,
      Lv this site!
      Do u hv the recipe for ur g'mas peanutbutter loaf? Would LUV to hv!

      Does anyone hv a recipe for "Protost" type product? Or a replacement recipe for "Sovex"? Wish we could get Southern SDA Univ. to start making it again!
      Thx, Nanci(Flier-Todd)Williams

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    3. Nanci - Someone posted a version of Peanut Butter loaf on the thread above this comment. Haven't tried it yet. When I do, I'll post it with photos on the regular blog. I have another one too that someone gave me. I'll try them both when I get the chance.

      Not sure if anyone has an alternative for Sovex. If I find one I'll post it.

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    4. Hi,
      Not being exactly "PC Savy", what does "posted in the thread above" mean? Trying to access "Peanut Butter Loaf" recipe.
      Thx
      Nanci Williams
      >dpnme247@gmail.com<

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    5. Nanci,
      If you scroll up the page on all the comments on this recipe (that's what a "thread" is - a string of comments) you will find, Actually, the recipe seems to be belo9w this one. Just to make it easier, here's the post with the PB loaf recipe:

      GRANDMOTHER WILCOX PEANUT BUTTER LOAF
      4 slices of bread toasted and rolled into crumbs
      1 can diced tomatoes
      1 onion
      1 1/2 c chopped celery
      3/4 c peanut better
      2 eggs
      2 tsp butter
      1 tsp sage
      Cook tomato, onion, celery, PB,butter for about 20-30 minutes in skillet. Add eggs and crumbs. Pour in a bread pan and bake 350 about 45 min. (another recipe says 30 min?!)

      Bon Appétit!

      KJ

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    6. Loving all these comments and recipes. My grandma Marie Bechtel had many wonderful recipes would make her own gluten steaks...which are a family favorite tradition carried on by my mom Arlean James Bechtel and now by my wife Evangelina Perez-Bechtel. I remember grandma used to make a lite brown gravy that she added peanut butter to and it was so good. That is the only way I, to this day, will eat peanut butter!
      Tom, I am glad you are not one of those militant vegans...very refreshing and delightful. Keep up the good work. -. Pastor John

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  22. I am wondering how many average sized patties this recipe makes. Look delicious. Thank you.

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    1. I usually get about eight, a good size casserole dish's worth.

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  23. Thank you for this recipe and wonderful insights. As an "old" SDA raised in Battle Creek, on good ole veggie food, I love potlucks. It breaks my heart to see well meaning people using diet as their way to salvation.

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  24. I made the peanut butter loaf as a kid. put the batter of it in an empty can and steam on top of the stove. Does anyone have the recipie?

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    1. Yes,I can help you with that. My cousin made it for me this summer when I was visiting her. I forgot how good it is and it is better cold on a sandwich the next day!! This is my grandmother's version.

      GRANDMOTHER WILCOX PEANUT BUTTER LOAF
      4 slices of bread toasted and rolled into crumbs
      1 can diced tomatoes
      1 onion
      1 1/2 c chopped celery
      3/4 c peanut better
      2 eggs
      2 tsp butter
      1 tsp sage
      Cook tomato, onion, celery, PB,butter for about 20-30 minutes in skillet. Add eggs and crumbs. Pour in a bread pan and bake 350 about 45 min. (another recipe says 30 min?!)

      Bon Appétit!

      KJ

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  25. Sitting in a cold office (50 degrees is nippy for Riverside CA) and reading this recipe made me salivate in a wonderful way. YES YES YES thanks for posting this, your amusing and insightful side comments, and your enduring patience. Oatmeal-fueled patience!

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  26. I'm so happy to have found your website! This recipe looks delicious and I can't wait to try it. We are plant-based other than eating eggs occasionally (due to having our own chickens who insist on laying them anyway); however, I'm used to tweaking non-vegan recipes to accommodate our lifestyle and will find a substitute for the cream of mushroom soup. Thank you!

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  27. A friend of mine was asking for a recipe for the oatmeal patties he remembered from potlucks. I remembered them with delight as well, so started looking in my old cookbooks for a recipe. Surprisingly, only found 1. So googled and got your web page and this one sounds good. Will certainly pass you blog on to others. KJ

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  28. Someone suggested adding peanut butter to the recipe. I slipped some in and my wife complimented me on my oatmeal patties. She's one of those people with a discerning palate and getting one past her taste buds is doing something. I just threw in a scoop of PB on top of the rest and mixed it up. Worked great. I did cut back on the oil just a tad because the peanut butter has oil in it.

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    1. I wondered if you could substitute peanut butter for the oil. Would you use all peanut butter (for the oil) and no oil if you were baking rather than frying the patties before making them into a casserole?

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    2. Peanut butter might sub for the oil. Never tried it. The recipe is pretty forgiving. Mostly the oil is used to fry it all in. If you try it, let me know how it works out.

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    3. I did try the peanut butter substitute and they were really good - nutty and with the pecans, walnuts or whatever nut meal you used (I once used slivered almonds), it has a pronounced nutty flavor that I like very much.

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  29. Do you know if Sovex is made any more?

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    1. Sadly, Sovex has been out of production for a few yrs now, & as of 2014,u cant get an honest answer as to why they havent restarted production! It was being made by the Southern ABC Store, but was shut dwn by the health dept. for mold in a batch. Since then it goes back & forth as to why its still dwn-because of management @ ABC Store,because prez of SDA University-but noone can say why! Ive personally hv spoken to both "bosses", & they only blame each other!
      I miss it soooo much! Nothing else settled an "iffy" stomach, or ur taste budd, as much as Sovex on dry toast!
      I accidentily came up w/a "sort of" replacement" a couple of yrs ago. A little nutritional yeast w/a little Bragg's Aminoes, a drip of peanut butter-dont ask me amounts, couldnt tell u-& some water. Not too bad.

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  30. Haven't seen any in a long time Judy. I found this address for the company now located in Collegedale.

    https://start.cortera.com/company/research/k3r9sqn8l/sovex-natural-foods-inc/

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  31. Wish there was a print button for your recipes.

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    1. You can always highlight what you want to print then go to Print and Print Selection and it will print what you have highlighted.

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    2. I'm going to work up all my recipes into a cookbook eventually, but for the website, I think I'll make pdf files of each page and post them on Google Docs or something where people can load the recipe and print it. Shouldn't be too difficult if I can just get the time. - Tom

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  32. You know that's a good idea. Let me work on that. I may be able to put a link to a Word file in Google Docs or something. Give me a bit to work on that. At some point I want to do a book anyway. Thanks for the suggestion.

    Tom

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  33. I'm glad I found this page. My hubby is lacto vegetarian and Im a vegan (not fanatic about leather and all that stuff) I love these recipes and look forward to modifying them simply because dairy products clogs my system. I enjoy your candid sense of humor and gets a good belly full of laughter to go with the meals when I start preparing them. Wish it was easy to print.

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  34. Going to try this. Need a dish for Sabbath potluck.

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  35. Tom, is there a can of mushroom soup in the gravy as well as the patties? I skimmed through the replies, and it's implied. There wasn't enough gravy for a 9 x 13 with just a cup of water. Your gravy in the photo also looked a lot lighter than mine. I'd already poured my gravy over the patties, so I just spread 1 can of mushroom soup over my gravy and stirred it up over the patties LOL!

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    1. That's one way to do it. If you'll look at the ingredients list, the gravy is made separately like regular gravy with flour and oil and the seasonings indicated. If you don't want to go to the trouble of making gravy, you can use mushroom soup. The recipe is nothing if not adaptable. Step 7 describes adding flour and water in the traditional gravy-making manner. A cup of water is just a start. And I don't put a lot of gravy over the patties anyway so they don't get too soggy. Sorry if that was confusing. It makes a lighter flour and oil based gravy. - Tom

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  36. Simpler. 1 cup rolled oats. 4 eggs. 2 cups rich broth made up of whatever you like. Olive oil as needed. Mix eggs and oats together. Heat oil in frying pan (about 2 -3 tbsp. depending on size of frying pan). If the pan is small, you will have to transfer the patties to a separate plate while cooking the others. Start temperature to heat oil at high, then reduce to medium while frying. Once you're finished frying all patties, return all to the pan and reduce heat to low. Pour in broth, cover and cook until broth is cooked away. I usually use plenty of salt and flavor in the broth to be sure the patties are fully flavored.

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    1. thanks. I'll have to give it a try.

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  37. Just found your post, lots of memories around the Oatmeal Steaks, or "Mushroom Patties" as we called them. So sorry about your son, one of the hardest events in life, I think. My husband died 13 months ago, and I too am trying to learn to live a new life, and adjust to a huge loss. Thanks for the recipe and welcome to the Pacific Northwest!

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  38. David Ladely

    I used to become upset with arrogant, presumptuous and sanctimonious individuals who felt they had a mission to educate less intellectually endowed others and champion peripheral issues despite an invitation.

    No longer. I have calmed myself with the understanding that people with this inclination may well be obtuse and self-aggrandizing; however, there might just be a point despite their condescension.

    I recall the fervor with which gelatin and rennin sources were debated with considerable contention decades ago. I lost my appetite for dining in certain social contexts for quite a time.

    The effect of such heated contention was akin to salting another's well. It wasn't as much about sharing as it was about vanquishing. One may be correct and a steward of fact. The operation may be a success but if the patient dies, does it still count?

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  39. As a Christian I believe that if you guess wrong on a minor point of doctrine, there won't be a big burly angel bouncer waiting at the Pearly Gates to say "Gotcha". In the same way, I don't really care about those who would take minor points of "nutritional" doctrine and turn them into Vegan hair-shirts in order to prop up their own egos and prove their veganity is more powerful than others vegetarianism. I like good food. I like things that'll give you a few more healthy years before you drop face first into the cottage cheese loaf. Jesus said not to worry about what you eat or what you wear, but to focus on the kingdom of heaven. This website is supposed to be fun and about traditional SDA potluck fare. For those with an ax to grind, please take it to the woodshop. Just sayin'.

    Tom

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  40. Is the oil in the recipe for frying or does it go in the patties??

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  41. I remember Mom making these, usually for Sabbath dinner. She'd make them Friday afternoon and put them in the fridge. Then she'd put them in a warm oven on our way to church. They'd be done when we got home. DELICIOUS! Sure do miss her cooking.

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  42. My mother in law taught me how to make oatmeal patties, I love to share them. She made her gravy with mushroom soup, I strain the mushrooms out of the soup, I don't care for them. I am glad we can buy mushroom soup without MSG. They are so easy to make and my family enjoys them. There are so many different ways you can make them. This is the first time I have seen this web site. Thank you for sharing your recipes.

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  43. Oh man, I know what I am having for dinner tonight. My mom used to make these also. She had eight mouths to feed and for the longest time we were vegetarian. Some of the ladies at potluck used to make them but they stopped, they are so good! Subscribing btw!

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    1. Glad you liked it. If you have any good recipes of your own, send them and I'll try them out.

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  44. Someone asked how many oatmeal patties this recipe makes. I get about 8 out of it. It rather depends on the size of the patties you make, though. Could be a couple more or a couple less. - Tom

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  45. I love the oatmeal patties. I have been looking for a good recipe for some time. The recipe was made as stated except I thought the oil was used for frying. They turned out wonderful anyway.
    There were so many comments about the oil, but no comments from those people about how good the patties were. Strange.
    By the way, I fried 18 small patties, then baked them in the oven with the gravy. Didn't have any mushrooms at the time, but the gravy was great anyway.

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  46. It's a very forgiving recipe with lots of room for error and experimentation. There are more than a few comments about how good they were. Most SDAs already know how good oatmeal patties are so they don't say anything about it. It's a given.

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  47. Tried this for the first time tonight. It's pretty good. Can't believe I'm eating fried oatmeal. (smile) My hubby and I just shared a patty and both agree that it is tasty. It was great plain. I did not make the gravy yet but suppose that I will since the first part is so good. I look forward to trying some more of you recipes.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed. I made up a big batch of these last week w/o the gravy and froze them. You just pull however many you want out and heat them in the microwave for a minute or two. Easy quick supper.

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